Other Programs

In addition to our Annual Clean Up, we work year round to help animals that have been entangled in discarded fishing line, as well as collect line from the environment and help keep more from ending up there.

Mini Clean Ups

REscues

With thousands of fishing locations throughout Hampton Roads, there are unfortunately also lots of places with discarded fishing line and hooks.  While we target the areas we have found the most line at during our Annual Clean Up, volunteers conduct mini clean ups throughout the year in many other locations.  We have gathered thousands of feet of line along with hooks, bobbers and other garbage from Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge, Munden Point City Park, Stumpy Lake Natural Area, and Lotus Garden Park, to name just a few.  As much of this clean up work needs to be completed from the water, we are always looking for volunteers with kayaks or canoes that are interested in helping out.  If you would like to find out more about joining us for our mini clean ups, please get in touch.

Thousands of animals die each year after becoming entangled in fishing line or stuck with fishing hooks.  However, through the work of the VBSPCA Wildlife Program's volunteers, many animals in Hampton Roads are given a second chance.  When the SPCA receives a call from a concerned member of the public, volunteers work to capture and bring in the animal, nurse them back to health, and then release them back into the wild. From a Canada goose that had fishing line around both ankles and femur so deeply embedded that it had to be surgically removed to a tern found hanging off a pier with severe tissue damage to his wing from the line wrapper around it, the SPCA has been able to provide happy endings to hundreds of animals each year.  Find out more about the work of the SPCA's Wildlife Program on their website.

Recycle Bins

If you have visited some of the area's popular fishing locations, you may have seen a special bin designed to collect fishing line and help keep it from being discarded into the environment.  (Fishing line in garbage cans can still pose a threat to wildlife if it blows out or an animal goes into the can after food.)  The bins are frequently emptied and the line sent back to the manufacturer.  There it is made into an underwater habitat structure that attracts fish and encourages plant growth, providing the necessities for a healthy fish population.  We are working to expand the number and range of these bins so are looking for volunteers to help place them, as well as periodically check the bins and gather the line.  If you are interested, please review our Adopt-A-Bin Adoption Agreement